One example of a restoration project is this 1971 Plymouth 'Cuda, restored by the TV show "Graveyard Carz" and featured in the Mopar stand during the 2016 SEMA show. 

Mopar | November 09 2016

Mopar Turbocharges Restoration Parts Searches

One little part – a door sill plate, radio volume knob, rear wheel opening trim – can bring a restoration project to a sudden stop.

Considering that many of the classic Dodge, Chrysler and Plymouth cars popular with the restoration crowd have been out of production for several decades, finding a missing part can easily become a months-long quest. Need proof? Just check out the throngs of parts hunters in the swap meet area at major car shows such as the Carlisle Chrysler Nationals.

Mopar wants to see these classic vehicles off the jack stands, out of the garages and on the road. So it has teamed with restoration parts vendor Classic Industries to provide enthusiasts an Internet portal to speed up the parts search.

The portal, www.mopar.com/restoration, was launched during the 2016 SEMA Show in Las Vegas. Users can find more than 9,000 authentic restoration parts listed.

“You’ll find a pretty complete range of parts for anyone’s restoration,” says Todd Beddick, Head of Mopar Accessory and Performance Portfolio. “Sheet metal is a big commodity, badges, trim for the interior and exterior. We even have the complete set of decals for cars that were in the Scat Pack.”

The Mopar site also includes a link to download a 550-page catalog of parts for heritage FCA US vehicles from Classic Industries.

Having a classic Dodge, Chrysler or Plymouth in your garage is cool. Driving it is even cooler. Now, finding parts is easier.

Mopar Or No Car.

Dale Jewett

Do you know your blood type? Mine is 100 octane (not your standard blood bank classification). At any given moment, I’m thinking about cars – driving one, fixing one, buying one or (in my dreams) restoring one. So I love to tell stories that involve horsepower, brake and wheel diameters
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Do you know your blood type? Mine is 100 octane (not your standard blood bank classification). At any given moment, I’m thinking about cars – driving one, fixing one, buying one or (in my dreams) restoring one. So I love to tell stories that involve horsepower, brake and wheel diameters and 0-to-60 times – and the people who make it happen. Because behind every awesome vehicle are amazing people with vision and the desire to make it a reality. I cover Mopar, Dodge, SRT and motorsports for FCA Digital Media. I learned to drive on a 1973 Jeep CJ-5 with the rare Super Jeep option package and three-speed manual transmission. I still belong to the dwindling club of people who prefer to shift their own gears, and think the best way to drive is with the top down!